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-called fiscal cliff that could send our economy into another recession. in these difficult times we're challenged by people we represent to find real solutions, not short-term band-aids. as we move forward, it's clear that we must discuss spending. emphasize that word "spending." i know that president obama is hyperfocussed on increasing taxes as part of his deficit-reduction proposal, and i think the the election shows that he's legitimate in doing that. but he could have really declared victory about three weeks ago and in the three weeks since then spend time talking about the expenditure side of the ledger. because if we're going to be serious about reducing our debt, we must talk about spending. not some time next year, not only after we talk about taxes. we must talk about spending and talk about it now. we need to have a thoughtful conversation that focuses upon where federal spending most calls for control and containment, and that's the purpose of my charts today. and that's the purpose of my remarks. and we must have a thoughtful conversation where our federal spending is
slow walks this process the closer our economy gets fought fiscal cliff. -- gets to the fiscal cliff. here's what we know. we know that the president wants more stimulus spending and an increase in the debt limit without any cuts or reforms. that's not fixing our problem. frankly, it's making it worse. on top of that, the president wants to raise taxes on many small business owners. now, even if we did exactly what the president wants, we would see red ink as far as the eye can see. that's not fixing our problem either. it's making it worse and it's hurting our economy. i think the members know i'm an optimist. i'm hopeful we can reach an agreement. this is a serious issue and there's a lot at stake. the american people sent us here to work together toward the best possible solution and that means cutting spending. if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering whe minority leader, ms. pelosi, for five minute
and academia, and they'll discuss the poll's results, middle class perspectives on the economy and the fiscal cliff. it's expected to get under way shortly, and we're bringing it to you live here on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, all. good morning. i'm john fox sullivan, i'm publisher at large of atlantic media company, we publish the atlantic, national journal, government executive, a new product, quartz, and we want to welcome you to this special event this morning. and i want to welcome our c-span audience which is tuning in. um, this is the 15th allstate/national journal heartland poll that we're going to be discussing this morning. since april of 2009, allstate and national journal and the atlantic have partnered in surveying the public opinion of a little bit oriented towards the mitt middle class -- middle class, but public at large. this was initiated by our friend ed reilly and ron brownstein of national journal and post the economic crisis, we decided to see what the american public pe
at when they look at the entirety of the fiscal cliff, and they have determined that this could drive the economy into negative for story, meaning back into a recession. that's the last thing we want to see. along the lines of growth, we need to be sure that we're not doing something here short term that puts the economy back in a position where we're not generating the kind of revenue because of the lack of growth to be able to deal with these issues and to be able to get these unemployment numbers down. in my view, this recovery is not your father's recovery, it's different in kind. it's different than any recovery we've had in this country. if you look at even the recovery in 2001 to 2003, that time period, recall we called it then the jobless recovery. and yet by this time in that recovery we'd already brought back 2.6 million jobs. so at this point after the recession began, 2.6 million jobs had returned. and that was considered jobless. if you look back at the recovery after the 1980 and '81 recession which was a recession that was also deep, in fact, unemployment was higher tha
this fiscal cliff. that's the convergence of higher tax rates and, of course, all the spending. >> both parties, democrats and the republicans need to come together. >> the our three branches of government, and congress, and the president are equal. and pretty much neither one has the right position for the country. >> i know that america is going to be a great country again. and that will fix the problems we have at home, and bring together the two parties that are dividing the country, and fighting for different things. i know that this is going to happen. >> we're only going to get out of this together. we're not going to get out of it as a democrat. we're not going to get out of it as republican. we're going to get out of it as an american. >> thank you, ed. thank you, joan. we're going to get on with a program right now. let the introduce the moderator of that program, ron brownstein. on its editorial director of the "national journal," which means he oversees all the little coverage coming out of our company. he writes a weekly column for "national journal." is regularly on cnn an
these myths, i hope that we have a more constructive discussion on averting this fiscal cliff. republicans have already stated they are willing to accept some new revenue. speaker boehner has put $800 billion in new revenues on the table. however, we still not have heard from any sub substantive ideas m the president or other leading democrats about cuts to spending or entitlements. we haven't even heard the president say good things about the simpson-bowles recommendations, a commission he appointed, a commission that had republicans and democrats on it, a commission that reported that had conservative republicans and liberal democrats saying we ought to do what we can to see the simpson-bowles approach through. it would be nice to see the president endorse a recommendation of a committee he appointed that had a suggestion for taking care of this fiscal cliff problem. if he had done that two years ago, we wouldn't be debating the fiscal cliff today. so there are serious concerns on my side of the aisle that any agreement we reach will result in immediate tax hikes but promise spending --
weeks, we must avoid driving the country over the fiscal cliff. no partisan ideology is worth the cost to the nation. but just averting disaster and kicking the can on the tough structural decisions needed to place our economy on sound footing for the future is not enough. we are calling for a framework to build out over the last ten years to reduce the deficit and restructure the fiscal policy. succumb as eventually to bring the budget into balance they must raise more revenue and encourage growth we must include parameters defined and future levels of debt as a share of the gdp and a date by which the budget will balance. and it must include changes to the discretionary spending, entitlements as well as defense. the elected leader should launch and extradited process to enact the legislation that will construct this remark in 2013 and putting powerful, the appropriate defaults and enforcement mechanisms. without a recalibrating sustainable fiscal policy, the united states international standing will decline and its national security will be undermined. such an outcome would be bad fo
the cliff, we need long-term fiscal reduction so businesses can plan for the future. to get families and businesses certain we must agree the next few weeks on specific spending cuts and specific revenue increases that reduced the deficit to avoid the fiscal cliff. we should not put off hard decisions of gimmicks or with triggers. that's what got us here in the first place. it's time to bite the bullet and make the tough decisions and make them now. the first thing we should do is immediately and permanently extend a middle-class tax cut. this will provide needed certainty to america's families and businesses and markets. this decisive action will ensure that millions of american families don't see attacks like of more than $2000 starting next month. in year-end agreement must also have a long-term extension of the debt ceiling. america cannot afford another debilitating to school showdown. it has to be a package deal. then we need to enact a long-term and comprehensive deficit solution. most serious plans recommend about $4 trillion deficit reduction over 10 years to restore fiscal
with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as a threat, using the debt ceiling as a way to achieve a different agenda is dangerous. it's playing with fire. and yet, with the opportunity to take that off the table, reassure the markets, the minority leader blinked. i don't know why. it's hard to figure out the strategy that he's employing, but we would hope on this side of the aisle -- and i think i speak for all of us -- that he would reconsider and perhaps early next week let us vote on his own resolution. i yield the floor. mr. schumer: i notice th
must avoid driving our country over the fiscal cliff. no partisan ideology is worth the cost of our nation. just averting the disaster and kicking the can on the structural decisions needed to place our economy on a sound footing of the future is not enough. we are calling for a framework over the next 10 years to reduce the deficit and restructure the fiscal policy. so is eventually to bring the budget into balance. this framework must include tax reforms to raise more revenues and encourage growth and enhance productivity. it must include parameters defined in future levels of debt as a share of the gdp. it must include changes to discretionary spending and entitlements as well as defense. our elected leaders should launch legislation that will construct this framework and 2013. including powerful but appropriate default of enforcement mechanisms. without a recalibrated unsustainable fiscal policy, the united states international standing will decline in the national security will be undermined. such an outcome would be bad for the united states, and it could be bad for the world.
the fiscal cliff. no partisan ideology is worth the cost to our nation. but just averting the disaster and kicking the can on the tough, structural decisions needed to place our economy on a sound footing for the future is not enough. we are calling for a framework built out over the next ten years to reduce the deficit and restructure fiscal policy. so as eventually to bring the budget into balance. this framework must include tax reforms to raise more revenue, encourage growth and enhance progressivity. it must include parameters defining future levels of debt as a share of the gdp. and a date by which the budget will balance. and it must include changes to discretionary spending, entitlements as well as defense. our elected leaders should launch an expedited process to enact legislation that will construct this framework many 2013 -- in 2013, including powerful but appropriate default and enforcement mechanisms. without a recalibrated, sustainable fiscal policy, the united states' international standing will decline, and its national security will be undermined. such an outcome woul
president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks to go before a potentially devastating and entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan that members of his own party won't even vote for. so i think it's safe to say at this point that the president actually isn't interested in a balanced agreement, he's not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and he's clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. what the president is really interested in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first, by raising taxes on small business that he believes are making too much money and then on everybody else, not so he can lower the debt or the deficit but so he can spend to his heart's contefnlts for months the president has been saying all he wants is to raise taxes on the top 2% so he can tackle the debt and the deficit. however, yesterday he finally revealed that's not really his true intent. by demanding
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12